Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Free Beer Movement Hall of Fame. Coming Soon!

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Monday, September 28, 2009

The Starting 11: An Interview with the American Outlaws and President Korey Donahoo

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Site Note: This is the second in a series of interviews the FBM is doing with interesting and important people and ideas in American soccer. Read our first interview with Jesse Nechodom, soccer-hater-turned-soccer-lover with part 1 and part 2.

It's easy to forget that The American Outlaws are only two years old. The US National Team supporters group has taken the American soccer scene by storm with hundreds of members, dozens of chapters around the country, and take a no prisoners attitude. The AO and their chapters host dozens of viewing parties, tailgates, and match events around the country each year in support of the US National Team.

Several AO members and chapters are planning to head down to Honduras for that crucial CONCACAF clash on October 10th (if its still held there) and on October 14th they'll be loud and proud at RFK Stadium in Washington DC for the final "Hex" World Cup Qualifier against Costa Rica (a match in which the FBM is skipping on their day job to fly out for!).

The Free Beer Movement had a chance to shoot a few questions over the AO President Korey Donahoo, who was nice enough to actually respond to them.

1) How did the Outlaws start? Where did the idea come from?

Just going to games, we saw a lack of consistency of events planned surrounding the game. Some games had killer tailgates, others had nothing planned, but there was always passionate fans looking to connect.

2) How have you been able to create a nation-wide following?

Consistency has been everything. Being at every game and having stuff set up for people to enjoy themselves for EVERY game has been the key, I think. Also, allowing people who want to get involved to pitch in, whether it be with designing shirts or starting their own chapter.

3) How many chapters do you have now? Where are they? What’s their function?

Off the top of my head, probably 15 or so. Their function is to unite fans from a certain area, let's say, Lincoln Nebraska, give those fans a place to meet for EVERY game, and a banner to display at the bar. Then, if that area were lucky enough to host a US game, (which Lincoln obviously won’t), the chapter gets to plan the national party.




4) What does US Soccer think about the Outlaws? What’s your connection with them?

US Soccer has been pretty helpful with certain aspects, mainly ticketing. They usually offer supporters section tickets at the best price and before general ticket sales, which has helped us a lot. There’s always room for our relationship to grow, but its been a good one thus far, overall.

5) What’s the current state of the union for American soccer (the game, the culture, the fan following, etc), in general?

There’s definitely a ground swell of new fans, a lot of which has to do with our success at the Confederations Cup. ESPN buying the English Premiership rights tells you everything you need to know…that it's only going to get bigger for the foreseeable future. I hope that Outlaws can help usher in some of these new fans, get them to a US game or two, and keep them coming back to support our boys.

6) What about the future for soccer in the United States?

It's bright, see #5…

7) One of my inspirations has been the passion I’ve seen when I’ve attending international matches abroad and the want to see that same passion in our stadiums in the US. How have your experiences been when travelling with the team in other countries? How does that influence you and the Outlaws?

Ironically, sometimes the best pro-US atmospheres I’ve experienced have been abroad. I’m thinking specifically of the 2nd world cup game against Italy in 2006. The camaraderie between US fans is something that never ceases to amaze me, and taking it abroad adds a new dimension. I’ll never forget the friendly against the English fans the night before US v England at Wembley, when we kicked their ass!

8) I was following your road trip to SLC on Twitter. Sounds like a lot of drinking and a few problems with your RV. Tell us some of the highlights and lowlights of the trip?

The highlights were everything related to the game itself. The camaraderie (we were broken down in Wyoming, and AO Houston drove almost 2 hours each way to pick us up, as well as getting a 2 hour ride back with complete strangers) was awesome. The tailgate was fun and intense, and the game ended with 3 points.

As for lowlights, everything related to the RV. 2 blown tires, breaking down in Wyoming and having to keep the windows open in order to not die of exhaust inhalation can be detrimental to any trip, even a US victory.

9) What sort of role do groups like the American Outlaws and the Free Beer Movement play in growing the sport?

Everybody likes feeling like part of a community, and then helping the community to grow in positive directions. We feel we follow the best team in the world, and we want our friends to share all the good times that it has brought us, and I think buying a skeptic a beer is a perfect way to usher in newbies.

10) What’s the beer of choice for the Outlaws?

Speaking for myself and Justin Brunken, the vice-President, Budweiser and PBR.

11) What’s next for the American Outlaws?

The World Cup (assuming we qualify) is going to be amazing. TenDot travel company in Lincoln has helped us with the logistics, and its going to be a wild ride. Until then, all the pretournament friendlies will be a great way to bring in new fans and prepare for South Africa.

Link: The American Outlaws

Photo Credit: Taken from The Shin Guardian's post on AO's trip to Salt Lake City

Video Credit: AO

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Our Answers to Some Very Good Questions

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Biggy over at Constantly Offside asked us to answer a few questions about the Free Beer Movement and since we haven't articulated what we're all about in a post in quite some time, we thought it might be a good idea to cross post the questions and our answers right here on the FBM Blog.

Constantly Offside: How would you describe the Free Beer Movement?

Free Beer Movement: The FBM is an organization based on bringing under exposed American sports fans to soccer games (live and on TV) through the medium of free beer. It relies on the motivation of American soccer fans to take the time to educate and entertain their non-soccer fan friends and family. Converting them to the sport is the goal (no pun intended) and free beer is the social lubricant.

American soccer fans are already going to and watching games, we just want them to bring someone new, buy them a beer (or 10), and have those people give soccer a look where previously they might never have had the opportunity. Free beer just makes it easier. And maybe they'll walk away with an appreciation of the sport.

CO: What beer is generally purchases for a friend for soccer games?

FBM: Really, whatever the hell they want. Whatever gets them through the gates. I'm real partial to Indian Pale Ales, but its all about luring them, I'm already sold on the sport. That being said there's a handy beer-to-soccer-level conversion-chart on our site which stipulates how many beers you have to buy friends relative to the level of match you're watching (from World Cup to youth soccer).

In the end, the beer is the gateway drug of choice to see the soccer.

CO: If Frankie Hejduk was a beer, what would be be?

FBM: He'd be the most all-American beer in the world. And I can't really claim that beers like Miller or Budweiser are really all-American anymore since they're owned by global brewers now.

I mean this guy loves America. He loves soccer and he loves beer. His commitment to his teams both domestically and for the national team is absolute. That's why we want him as our spokesperson. He IS American soccer.

If he were a beer, he'd be in a red, white, and blue can with him riding a giant bald eagle with a soccer ball in his talons. And the beer would taste like heaven in a bottle.

CO: Why don't other people understand that the world would be a better place with both more beer and more soccer?

FBM: I think most people readily acknowledge that the world is better place with beer in it. It certainly makes life worth living. And most of the world considers the world a better place with soccer. It just about bridging those two beliefs for Americans.

I think that sometimes beer can make the average girl at the bar look pretty and right now American soccer is that average girl at the bar for most Americans. Put a few beers in you and she starts to look real good, you go over an talk to her, and then you find out she's really cool and now you're hooked. Beer is going to help soccer look at lot better to a lot of Americans (at least I hope) and next time when their sober they'll keep on giving it a chance.

News Watch: Soccer Photography, More Good News for US Soccer, MLS grows with ESPN Deportes, and Go USA Bid's Boost

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A few Ameri-centric soccer posts working their way around the Inter-Web-O-Sphere:

* Soccer in America - A Photographic Journey

This is great stuff. The FBM sent in one of our pictures from a recent Austin Aztex game and it was there first picture in the feature! Some of the other ones have been pretty good as well (I'm thinking the Tony Danza Army). This is a great way to document the growing influence American soccer has on each of our lives. Check out all the photos in their growing archive. Send in your own if you have any, too.


"Just when I thought you couldn't possibly be any dumber, you go and do something like this... and totally redeem yourself!" (The Dispatch was on our shit list for their bad mouthing of our man, Frankie Hejduk). Now all is well again with last week's feature on the growth of the game in the U.S. including wise words from Mr. Hejduk.

* ESPN reports "significant growth" of Major League Soccer on Deportes

'Nuf said. This is good news as any upward moving for MLS tells the suits in Bristol, Conn. to hold on to their undies because soccer in growing in American. Pull the cameras out of the national jump roping competition and rock, paper, scissor playoffs; there's a new sheriff in town. (Notice how even after we said "nuf said" we still rambled? We have a bad habit of doing that.)

And,

* Go USA Bid gets boost from Seattle Sounder's owner Drew Carey on the Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson:


Tried to check and see if the sticker was still on Craig's desk later. Results: inconclusive. And when I said "tried to check" I didn't actually because 1) I don't have a TV (pirated Internet streams!) and 2) I would never stay up late enough to catch such hilarity.

Did we mention that Carey "tweeted" us and said he wanted to do a FBM event sometime? No? Well he did. Seriously.

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

The Starting 11: An Interview with Jesse Nechodom (Part 2)

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Site Note: This is the second part of our first interview with people and ideas that are shaping American soccer the Free Beer Movement has lined up. Our first interview is with an old friend of the Movement, Jesse Nechodom. Read part one about Jesse's background as a sports fan and his early soccer experiences.
- Dan

6) Now that you’ve become more familiar with soccer, and with your love of other sports, is there anything you see in soccer than you can’t get in other sports.

I would say that what I’ve found with soccer that is more surprising to me is that I can get many of the same things in soccer that I get in other sports such as upsets (US Nats), frustration with teams not performing up to their potential (US Nats), and inspired play with non-stop tension and excitement (take Sunday’s Manchester derby for example). If there is one thing about soccer that doesn’t exist in other sports (outside of maybe hockey which I don’t follow) it’s the pure joy of a goal since it doesn’t happen so often and the tension and excitement of when a team is constantly threatening and putting on pressure to score (the misconception turns out to actually be a good thing.)

7) You live in Paraguay now and recently saw their national team face off against Argentina in a World Cup qualifier. How was that?

Well, it’s hard to summarize in words but it was pretty incredible overall. The stadium and fans had a much more European feel to it as the supporters groups behind the end lines of the stadium sang and chanted all game long and the rest of the crowd joined in quite often. Paraguay won the game and qualified for the WC so the crowd went crazy and so did the city with everyone outside their houses singing and dancing in the street waving flags on our cab ride home.

Seeing Messi in person was incredible though he didn’t play well as he tried to beat 5 defenders and score every time he touched the ball. Maradonna on the sidelines looked fat and depressed just like you’d imagine he would (we kept watching to see if he’d do a line of coke to make himself feel better but he never did). I didn’t take pictures of the pre game part, but we did take some non-fans to the game promising a fun atmosphere and had some beers and food before the game so the FBM spirit lives in South America!

8) You’re hosting a Free Beer Match Day down in Paraguay. When? How’s that going to go down?

Later this afternoon (last Sunday) I’m heading to a match between a couple teams in the local league as I attempt to choose a team here. We’re going to head downtown a bit early to grab a few drinks and some food again before the game and then hopefully enjoy a good match. The more formal FBM Match Day I plan to host will be when the US plays Honduras in October. A friend of mine (who grew up a soccer fan in the DC area) has a nice TV with pretty fast internet here so we’ll stream the game on his computer, hook it up on the TV, and invite people over to drink some beers and enjoy. I’ll send in some pics to the FBM after the fact.

9) What is it about beer and sports that they go so well together?

I think people enjoy sports to relax and escape their everyday routines and they enjoy beer for the same reasons so it’s perfectly natural that they go well together. Plus a good beer can just be so refreshing when you’re sitting out in the hot sun watching a game and eating some salty snacks.

10) You probably won’t live abroad forever and when you come back to the States all those sports that you’ve watched and supported all of your life will be available. Do you think that your enthusiasm for soccer will continue with such competition?

My guess is that I might watch soccer less (since it’s pretty much all I watch here cuz there’s nothing else on TV) but based on how I’ve continued to follow all the sports I’ve become a fan of while seeing them less here, I don’t think I’ll stop. There’s no other sports on early Saturday or Sunday mornings which would interfere with my watching of soccer so when a good game is on I’ll still tune in. I have always found time for sports I’m interested in before and I’ll find time for soccer when I’m back in the US.

11) You really personify what the Free Beer Movement is trying to do, turn other sports fans into soccer fans as well. For those of us trying to convert more people like you, what advice do you have?

Free beer is a great starting point to get people involved. Once at a game or watching a game, I would try to make comparisons between soccer and other sports to relate what the person is seeing to what they know (I’m a teacher so that’s called building on background knowledge).

Lastly, I would strongly recommend somehow giving the potential convert a chance to play soccer in a fun and not super competitive situation. For me I need to play a sport to truly appreciate it and how difficult it is to do what you see elite players doing. Organize a “friendly” match with some friends, tell the players who know what they are doing to take it a bit easy, and watch the conversion happen. If your potential convert is like me and enjoys playing sports as much as watching them, this experience playing a sport is the key to get them interested in supporting it. Who knows, you might even find yourself a new defender or midfielder for your intramural or indoor team in the process!

Monday, September 21, 2009

News Watch: Germans Continue to Love the Free Beer Movement

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First it was Bayern Munich hosting their own "Free Beer Match Day" (What no pics guys? Shesh!).

Now it's Stuttgart's keeper Jens Lehmann (former German National Team and Arsenal #1) getting dropped by the first team because he attended Oktoberfest after a match this past weekend (thanks for Near Post Blog for the heads-up). What is with the Germans and free beer?

Much like Norm MacDonald's oft-quoted Saturday Night Live Weekend Update line "Germans love David Hasselhoff," I think pretty much everyone can agree that the Germans also love the Free Beer Movement (don't pay attention to the fact that we have no current German members).

I think that it's time the Free Beer Movement make Mr. Lehmann an "honorary" member of the Free Beer Movement for his actions this past week.

The Starting 11: An Interview with Jesse Nechodom (Part 1)

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Site Note: This is the first in a series of interviews about the people and ideas that are shaping American soccer the Free Beer Movement has lined up. Our first interview is with an old friend of the Movement, Jesse Nechodom.
- Dan


Jesse Nechodom is probably one of the biggest sports fans I have ever met. In college we called him "SportsCenter Jesse" for his encyclopedic knowledge of sports; except soccer. For all of his expertise, he did not like soccer in the least and swore he never would. Despite my best, and probably annoying, efforts throughout our four years in college it seemed like a lost cause.

Three years ago he moved to Honduras (to teach at a private school) and with few other options he fell for soccer. Hard. When I moved down there (my wife and I decided to teach down there as well) for a year with him it was almost scary how into soccer he was compared when we went to college together.

For Jesse it was being surrounded by soccer (and a bit of beer as well, I think!) that brought him to the sport and left him with a lasting, lifelong impression of the passion and skill that is tied to soccer.

He is the model example of who the Free Beer Movement is targeting. Sports fans, under-exposed to a sport they probably would appreciate if they took the time.

The following are a series of questions I asked him to answer to flesh out his evolution as sports and soccer fan, how beer helped the conversion, and a few of his cooler soccer-related experiences.

1) Before becoming a soccer fan you were, shall we say, a bit of a fanatic about other sports. Can you tell me a little bit about who you are as a sports fan?

I’ve loved sports for as long as I can remember and that love started with football. I am from a small town just outside Green Bay, Wisconsin so I was born a Packer fan. Being tall I soon began playing basketball as well and was a kid who just wanted to play pretty much any sport that came along. I play golf, track, baseball, ultimate Frisbee, Frisbee golf, and even wrestled for short time in elementary school. I am still a rather avid fan of the major American sports including MLB, NFL, NBA, PGA, college basketball, and college football. In all sports I am very much a “homer” in supporting Wisconsin teams.

It always seemed natural to me to be a fan of the teams where you were from. The other thing in common with my sports fandom is that I became a fan of the sports I played therefore soccer and hockey were left off my list due to never having played them outside of gym class.

2) You moved to Honduras two years ago. The mainstream American sports that you followed were few and far between. Tell me about your evolution to becoming a soccer fan. What brought you to the sport?

The first time I went to a soccer game in Honduras it was, in true FBM style, because everyone decided to have some beers and go check out the local team. The atmosphere was fun, everyone continued drinking, and I enjoyed myself even though I don’t remember much about the game.

The next time I went to a game, it wasn’t as hard to convince me to go again because I had a good time at the first game. The second game I attended I do remember a bit more because I paid more attention. It was an early WC qualifier with Honduras hosting Puerto Rico and I had heard in advance about this guy David Suazo who was supposed to be pretty good and played in Italy so I paid attention to see what the fuss was all about. In watching Suazo it was immediately obvious that he was on a different level completely than anyone else out on the field and I watched more closely. What I began to notice is how the players worked off of each other and how spacing and cutting were important parts of the game… just like basketball.

A few years ago I watched some friends playing indoor soccer in Milwaukee and remember thinking the same thing that night as the spacing, cutting, and knowledge of where your teammates are reminded me of basketball. This began to open my mind to soccer. What sealed it for me was the chance to play the game a bit with some friends in a fun and not super competitive situation. The combination of beginning to see how the game worked with being able to play it (even though I’m terrible) hooked me and I’ve been working to make up for lost time in learning the game ever since.

3) What misconceptions about the sport have been cleared up since you started becoming a fan?

First, let’s state the stereotypes about soccer that the majority of the American public have: it’s boring because there’s not much scoring, soccer players are “wusses” who can’t take any contact, and it doesn’t take much talent because soccer is just a bunch of running. I’d say the first misconception was cleared up for me once I actually began to watch how people moved off the ball and set up the goals during games, but I really didn’t do this a ton until I had the chance to play the game myself a bit and actually realize what people do off the ball. Relating what you see on TV off the ball to what it’s actually like for you playing makes it much less boring. The lack of scoring makes goals that much more exciting as well which makes it worth it.

The “wusses” comment comes from what football players seem to think about soccer players because they don’t realize the amount of contact that happens in a game. I would say that from experience basketball is just as physical a sport as soccer is and nobody calls basketball players wusses. Part of this label comes from how people dive and fake injuries in soccer as well which goes against the ethos of sports like basketball and football where people are admired for playing through pain and being tough guys.

I must admit that I really can’t stand diving and faking injuries in soccer (as I’m sure most fans can’t) and people who make the argument that its part of the game actually make me like the game a bit less. I don’t know if I’ll ever get over that problem. Lastly all it takes to overcome the skill argument is playing against and being made a fool of by someone who actually does possess the skills you lack in the game to make you realize the skill that is involved. After this happens to you, you will recognize skill when watching a match where you didn’t see it before.

4) How does live soccer (national team games, atmosphere, etc) really make the sport?

In my experience, almost any sport is better when you see it live. This tends to apply extra for soccer because in much of the world the crowd is half the attraction. To some extent at the games I’ve attended in Honduras and 100% of the time at the games here in Paraguay the crowd sings, chants, jumps, and is generally much more interesting than a crowd at any other sporting event I’ve been to. Goal celebrations in particular are something to behold.

5) There’s no real middle ground when it comes to you and being a fan of sports. Tell me how becoming a soccer fan has translated into your support of the US National Team as well.

Well, I’d have to agree with you about there being no real middle ground with me and sports. I’m either borderline obsessive or not really interested at all in a sport. As evidence of my newfound borderline obsession with soccer, as I type these answers I’m watching the Manchester derby (WOW by the way) and during halftime flipped over to Cagliari – Inter so I don’t have any dead soccer air. Given my sports history as a “homer” it was only natural that I would have to become a fan of the National Team.

I started reading about the team a little and watching some games, the background stories of a few of the players made them even more interesting and I quickly grew attached (those players would be Dempsey given his lower class upbringing and Demerit since he went to high school 20 minutes from where I grew up and he is the ultimate sports Cinderella story). Luckily for me this newfound interest came in time for me to watch WC qualifiers and the Confed Cup which only solidified my status as a dedicated fan.

Saturday, September 19, 2009

"Recruit Frankie" Petition and E-mail Campaign Kicks Off Today!

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Dear Free Beer Movers and Fans,

Today, the Movement kicks off its drive to "Recruit Frankie" to convince USMNT player and Columbus Crew captain Frankie Hejduk to become our official spokesperson. Please read our post "The Case for Frankie" for further information as to why we seek Mr. Hejduk to join our Righteous cause.

Such a monumental undertaking cannot be done alone. We need need your help.

Please help us by doing the following:

1) Sign our online petition. We will eventually present this to Mr. Hejduk and Mr. Mitchell (see option #2) as evidence of the desire for Frankie to join us.

2) E-mail Shawn Mitchell, Columbus Crew beat reporter for the Columbus Dispatch with the following text:

"Dear Mr. Mitchell,

Next time you speak with Mr. Frankie Hejduk, please ask him about the Free Beer Movement and their campaign to "Recruit Frankie" to become their official spokesperson. Have Mr. Hejduk get in touch with the FBM by e-mailing them at: freebeermovement@gmail.com.

Thank you for your help,

_____________ (your name here)"

3) Put our "campaign poster" on your site:



Let us know in the comments section, you've sent an e-mail to Mr. Mitchell or signed the petition so we can keep track of our supporters' numbers. Thanks for all your efforts!

Join the Movement! Recruit Frankie!

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

"It Starts Here...." by Nike

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In mid-June Nike dropped its latest advert for the U.S. National Team in preparation for their summer qualifiers. Somehow we hadn't caught it until today (must have missed it running on ESPN... right).

"It Starts Here"

It Starts Here from Aaron Drake on Vimeo.



This might be one of our favorites since Nike finally started pumping some dollars into marketing the team and the players (yet not enough for us to see these quality commercials running enough). Quiet, but still intense; the kind of commercial that gave us a few goosebumps of excitement for October 10th's gigantic away clash at Honduras.

SITE NOTE: Also, don't forget we're still taking your beer suggestions in the post below. Add you two cents in the comments section.

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

What's Your Beer of Choice?

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Hey, Free Beer Movers (yup, that's what we're calling you all now... get used to it). It has been a slow week here at the site and while we're working on some big things behind the scenes we just wanted to touch base with everyone who's stopping by.

The FBM is always looking for tasty new brews to sample while catching our American soccer on the Tee Vee. So, a quick question for our readers:

What's your beer (or other drink) of choice when sitting down for a footie game?

Leave all of your suggestions in the comments section for us and others to take stock in.

Sunday, September 13, 2009

And lookie, lookie who just scored!

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Yesterday we updated readers about a harsh article that the Columbus Dispatch wrote about our boy Frankie Hejduk and his recent lack of contribution to the Crew cause.

Boy, oh, boy did someone light a fire under the "Captain Free Beer" (as we're referring to him from here on out).

Frankie scored the opening goal
(and his first of the season) in the 34th minute of their Sunday clash against the Houston Dynamo en route to a 2-1 victory (courtesy of a late, late Eddie Gaven goal).

Photo Credit: MLSNet.com

Saturday, September 12, 2009

"Recruit Frankie" Tracker

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We're still waiting by the phone to hear from Frankie Hejduk about our offer to join the Free Beer Movement as our spokesperson (waiting....), but until the call comes in and we can begin negotiating a contract (we'll start at $0 and all the beer you can drink) we'll just follow his on-field exploits.

US National Team coach Bob Bradley didn't call up Frankie for this past week's crucial qualifiers against El Salvador and Trinidad and Tobogo and one could say it looked like the squad missed some veteran leadership to light the fire underneath the boys. Six points in two matches, but something was missing from the matches. Obviously, the Frankie factor.

Despite the squad snub, Frankie is still contributing to his Columbus side, right? Well, the Columbus Dispatch worries about Hejduk's age in a recent article asking whether the 36 year-old still has enough gas in his tank. Hejduk has missed 14 of the Crew's 23 matches to injury or USMNT duty. The article questions both Frankie's and designated player Guillermo Barros Schelotto's fitness and age, but mostly trashes their team's captain in the article. A bit of a low blow, we say, for someone who gave so much to the team last year and continue to do so when fully fit.

Side note: No mention of the Free Beer Movement's drive in the Dispatch article (yet).

In other Frankie news, a thread was started on Big Soccer (probably the sport's biggest web presence) about Mr. Hejduk and our quest to land him as our spokesperson. Looks like we have some strong support from Crew fans for his next big time gig.

At post time the FBM was still frantically checking their e-mail for the 100th time today to see if Frankie wrote back, but to no avail thus far. We'll still keep pushing though, but we need your help.

Don't forget, if you want to join in our quest to "Recruit Frankie," place our poster on your site and link back to the FBM:

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Free Beer Hangover

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The Movement caught the USA v T & T game last night and are still feeling a bit sick about the performance. But we're not an analysis site, we're a promotion site (we love American soccer even if it has a poor game here or there), so enough of that...

We are looking for any photos or great stories from your viewing parties last night (or from the weekend) where you took someone new and introduced them to our beautiful game. E-mail us at: freebeermovement@gmail.com.

Still looking for some words of wisdom following last night stinker? Good analysis can come from these guys:

- The Shin Guardian

- That's On Point

- Snorting the Endline

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

Today's the Day.... (re-post)

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Editor's Note: This is our "get fired up" post for US international matches. We'll re-post it for all our qualifiers.

Today's the day the US National Team takes the field in World Cup Qualification.

Today's the day they face Trinidad and Tobago in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad.

Today's the day we will miss Mr. Frankie Hejduk

Today's the day we take three points and move a step closer to booking our tickets to South Africa.

Today's the day that Howard will shine, Landon will lead, goals will be scored, and timely tackles will be made.

Today's the day we sit down with friends and fellow soccer fans and cheer on the home team.

Today's the day we invite someone new to come along and experience the power of a soccer match.

Today's the day they'll get a free cold one to enjoy while watching the sport we so desperately love and the team we'd follow to the ends of the earth (or South Africa!).

Today's the day we ask a non-soccer fan to join our footballing family.

The Free Beer Movement is about spreading the love of American soccer to all corners of the nation and no day is better than today. Today, the pride and joy of our nation's game takes the field in order to continue its push towards the greatest sporting spectacle of all-time, the World Cup.

The past, present, and future of American soccer all take the field today to join in one cause, to win, and to move on to the next level.

It is days like this we, as American soccer fans embrace, as our national team fights for our country's continued respect on the international stage and to stake a claim as the best team in North and Central America.

Games like today are bigger than any game; bigger than any MLS game, and bigger than your son or daughter's kick around in the park.

Our local colors blend. There are no more yellow and black of the Columbus Crew or orange and white of the Houston Dynamo or the black and red of DC United; today there is only RED, WHITE, and BLUE.

These are the days that our nation's best and brightest shine on the field for 90 minutes. For themselves, for soccer, but mostly for you... the American.

These are the days that you have to get up as a soccer fan in America.

So grab you friends, grab those soccer fans, grab those ones you want to become soccer fans, and most importantly grab some really cold beers because today's the day we support our National Team and our national game we love so much.

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Free Beer Movement USA Watch Party in St. Paul, MN

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I got an e-mail from Nick at Snorting the Endline, a blog we like to follow, and he's offering FREE BEER to anyone that's interested in joining him at the Sweetwater Grill and Bar in St. Paul, Minnesota for the big game tomorrow (Wednesday).

Read all about the invite and his special quiz question to get the free beer with his free beer post.

Any other Free Beer Events out there tomorrow or in the future? Let us know!


Monday, September 7, 2009

The Movement: What YOU Can Do

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"Ask not what the Free Beer Movement can do for you, but what you can do for the Free Beer Movement." - President John F. Kennedy, 1960

We're pretty sure the quote went something like that, although we may have mixed up a word or two. Either way the essence of the quote is intact.... yeah.

The Free Beer Movement site exist as a promoter of the idea that free beer can help increase the profile of American soccer. It also exists as a documenter of the culture of American soccer.

What we need from you, faithful supporters and members of the FBM, is to take the idea of the Movement and practice what we preach.

We would love to buy every person who has not been exposed to the beauty of the American game a nice cold beer, but there's not enough money in the FBM coffers to do such a thing.

It it incumbent upon our followers to expose American soccer to the under-exposed. It has to come from your love of the game and it has to come from your pocketbook.

I'm sure you're asking, "What kind of half-ass deal is this?"

The kind where you do exactly what you've already been doing (going to games, talking other peoples' ears off about the sport, and drinking beer), but now doing it all at once.

The Free Beer Movement is not asking you to fund a 50 person party with free beer before the next US international or MLS weekend match, we are asking you to invite at least one more person that usual to the next game (on TV or at the stadium), buy them a beer or two or three or more if the generous mood suits you (tell them sorry, but the ticket is on them), and show off our sport.

Finally, when you've done so... tell us. We want to hear your successes and failures. We want to see your pictures from the games. We want to know which beers you toasted with the new guy (or girl) as another barrier of soccer ignorance is broken down.

Loving soccer is really easy. We've got a million and one reasons why we support the sport. What is more difficult is passing that passion onto another and selling it to them.

That's why we and the idea of free beer is here.

Share your passion. Tell us your stories.

News Watch: Struggling German Giants Join Free Beer Movement

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The Free Beer Movement has members in at least six countries and dozens of U.S. states, but this weekend we gained a very prestigious member in Germany. I don't think they know it yet, but German super-club Bayern Munich just joined the Free Beer Movement with this move:

"Fans of Bayern Munich, who have made their worst start to the Bundesliga for 43 seasons, will get a chance to drown sorrows before Saturday's (yesterday's) home match with champions VfL Wolfsburg.

The Bavarian club are to give away more than 7,000 litres of beer before the game as part of a sponsorship deal with a Munich-based brewery."


I'm assuming Landon Donovan mentioned us while he was over there on load last season.

Whether or not Bayern in conscious of their new "honorary" membership in the FBM it is a great reminder of the powerful combination of free beer and soccer. Even when you team is down and out, at any point in the season, free beer can do the trick.

So where ever you are in the world right now, find a game, bring some friends, and join the Germans and us in the Free Beer Movement!

Saturday, September 5, 2009

Today's The Day...

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Today's the day the US National Team takes the field in World Cup Qualification.

Today's the day they face El Salvador in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Today's the day we will miss Mr. Frankie Hejduk.

Today's the day we take three points and move a step closer to booking our tickets to South Africa.

Today's the day that Howard will shine, Landon will lead, goals will be scored, and timely tackles will be made.

Today's the day we sit down with friends and fellow soccer fans and cheer on the home team.

Today's the day we invite someone new to come along and experience the power of a soccer match.

Today's the day they'll get a free cold one to enjoy while watching the sport we so desperately love and the team we'd follow to the ends of the earth (or South Africa!).

Today's the day we ask a non-soccer fan to join our footballing family.

The Free Beer Movement is about spreading the love of American soccer to all corners of the nation and no day is better than today. Today, the pride and joy of our nation's game takes the field in order to continue its push towards the greatest sporting spectacle of all-time, the World Cup.

The past, present, and future of American soccer all take the field today to join in one cause, to win, and to move on to the next level.

It is days like this we, as American soccer fans embrace, as our national team fights for our country's continued respect on the international stage and to stake a claim as the best team in North and Central America.

Games like today are bigger than any game; bigger than any MLS game, and bigger than your son or daughter's kick around in the park.

Our local colors blend. There are no more yellow and black of the Columbus Crew or orange and white of the Houston Dynamo or the black and red of DC United; today there is only RED, WHITE, and BLUE.

These are the days that our nation's best and brightest shine on the field for 90 minutes. For themselves, for soccer, but mostly for you... the American.

These are the days that you have to get up as a soccer fan in America.

So grab you friends, grab those soccer fans, grab those ones you want to become soccer fans, and most importantly grab some really cold beers because today's the day we support our National Team and our national game we love so much.

Friday, September 4, 2009

The Case for Frankie Hejduk, Free Beer Movement Spokesperson

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Frankie likes soccer. We like soccer. Frankie likes beer. We like beer. Frankie has flowing locks. We have...er.... hair, too.

Frankie Hejduk is one of the most celebrated National Team players in recent times. He's not poster boy Landon Donovan with dozens of goals to his name and he's not up and coming like man-child Jozy Altidore. Hejduk just shows up every day, clocks in, and does what he does.

FIFA recently wrote an article on Frankie calling him a "working class hero" and we at FBM (who aren't particularly good at writing) probably couldn't think of better words to describe the 84-times capped Nat player.

Since 1996 Frankie has been a figure in the U.S. National Team and despite numerous injures, several failed sojourns throughout Europe, he remains, at 34, a major contributor to the American cause. As recently as the 2-2 tie away in El Salvador Hejduk's 20 minutes in the match was full of inspired play as he literally dragged the U.S. from the brink of disaster.

The intrepid defender launched a cross which Altidore headed home to close the gap to 1-2 and then late in the game Hejduk nearly ran over Altidore in a goal-mouth scramble to secure his seventh Nats goal, tie the game, and save the U.S. blushes.

Hejduk's steadfast commitment to the national cause (he took a slap in the face from a Mexican assistant coach in February!) and his domestic leadership as captain of the defending MLS Cup champions Columbus Crew ("The Football Pub" would have wanted me to say that.) has solidified the Free Beer Movement's opinion that Frankie is destined for even more greatness (even the British press think he's great!).

His true greatness lies in another mission, one more exciting than ever before, and that is to assume a new cause; that of the Free Beer Movement.

Frankie is the model soccer and beer lover. Drafted in the inaugural MLS Draft back in 1996 and having played in almost 100 National Team matches makes Frankie the ultimate American soccer warrior. Additionally, as mentioned in a previous post, his commitment to beer is second to none.

Frankie Hejduk is not only the model member of the Free Beer Movement, but he is the perfect spokesperson for the FBM. No one, other than, Mr. Hejduk is in a better position to preach of the greatness of American soccer.

That's why today, on the eve of the U.S. National Team's World Cup qualifying match against El Salvador, we're launching the "Recruit Frankie" drive on the Free Beer Movement. In essence we want Frankie to be the public face of the Free Beer Movement.

If you like to join us in asking Frankie to speak for the FBM take this icon and put in on your blog, your Facebook page, where ever.



Right now we're not exactly sure how to go about contacting Frankie directly (if anyone knows anything please send an e-mail), but here are a few indirect ways:

1)Send a request to Frankie Hejduk through his agent, NOPAC Talent.


2) Write to Frankie Hejduk at the Columbus Crew:

Administration Offices
Attn: Frankie Hejduk
Columbus Crew Stadium
One Black & Gold Blvd.
Columbus,OH 43211

3) Any other suggestions? Please e-mail us at: freebeermovement@gmail.com

No matter what... let's "Recruit Frankie"!

Wednesday, September 2, 2009

Frankie Hejduk.... FBM Spokesperson?

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Matthew over at "The Shin Guardian" pointed us in the direction of this video. It's Frankie Hejduk slamming a beer with Columbus Crew supporters before a match.

It just leaves me with one simple question: Frankie, will you be our spokesperson?



The Free Beer Movement is looking to recruit Frankie as our chief spokesperson. Clearly he's a beer lover and no one is questioning his commitment to American soccer (Remember.. he got slapped by that Mexican assistant coach after the Columbus qualifier?)

On the week of the World Cup qualifier against El Salvador (which sadly Frankie will not be apart of) we at the FBM think it is appropriate to approach Mr. Hejduk to take on this position.

The Free Beer Movement needs a visable, beer drinking, American soccer-loving face. We have chosen Mr. Hejduk. FBM members will you join us in recruiting him?

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Fashion Feature: Objectivo Soccer T-Shirts

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We here at the Free Beer Movement aren't above shameless plugs, especially when we feel as though we've got something good to share with our members and guests.

Today, we'd like to introduce you to Objectivo Soccer T-Shirts. Yesterday, they featured the FBM on their blog and we thought we could return the favor.

The problem with being a soccer fan sometimes is that we lack options for showing off our fandom. Of course we'll wear our team jersey with pride, but there's only so many days in a row that you can before someone starts complaining of the body odor locked in your 'dryfit' armpits. Warm-up jackets and BS walking-billboard "Nike Soccer" shirts (really... ask yourself; Is Nike advertising themselves or soccer? I think it's pretty clear.) hardly fill the void.

That's where Objectivo comes in. It gives both the soccer fan and the fashion fan an opportunity to show off their devotion to the sport. Their designs are creative and completely original, giving everyone a chance to show off their passion for their team, a player, or the sport in general.

Below are a few of our personal favorites. They've got a great line of US-centric team and player shirts and I can't think of any better conversation-starter than one of their "Jay, Jay from the USA" shirts.







Objectivo also has a great news and highlights blog attached to the store, so check that our too.

Link: Objectivo Soccer T-Shirts

P.S. Hey, Objectivo... feel free to send a shirt our way (cough, cough "join or die" cough, cough)!